Tuesday, November 25, 2008

"We're Capturing the First Drafts of History."

WHAT DID YOU THINK of our guest, Jim MacMillan?

Here are a few things that stood out for me:

- "Wherever physical casualties occur, there will be psychological injuries," Jim said, quoting from one of his former professors.

- Don't stand under power lines at fires and crash sites.

- Jim stressed that there is a possibility of retraumatizing the audience by replaying video and sound, or by showing images, or through words in print. For instance, this picture could bring back difficult memories for those involved:
Was the image of the crying victims exploitation or good, solid journalism? Is showing images of crime perpetuating violence or helping to eradicate it?

Thoughts?

25 comments:

Anonymous said...

OK good things in is speech but seemed to be on cocaine the entire time. Man I seem to see your beliefs ringing loud George. Could you bring in anymore people to bash republicans. Everyone of your guest does it...do you guys rehearse this before they speak. Next guest in class I am not coming Thank God I saved me two absences... journalist huh!!!! ya. Also god did he have an agenda.... ya know man these guest further prove to th intelligent person journalism is dead...DEAD. Thats right he takes pictures of tragedy but all he could do is talk about his disdain not for the people who cause this war (terrorists) but the president. I get you don't like him that has nothing to do with your artsy f artsy pictures that quite frankly with out an administration that believes in free speech you would not have. Quite whining Jim and be a man oh by the way the fairness doctrine let that shit pass see how many picture you take...or long you work for that matter.

Geo said...

Does that mean you would or would not run pictures of greiving victims of crimes?

- George (the teacher who thinks you should learn from every experience, whether you agree with people or not. By the way, Rich, please don't leave anonymous posts. If you feel strongly enough to comment, take ownership of your statements.)

summergirl said...

In the example of the controversy over whether they should have run the picture of the crying daughters of the killed police officer, I would say yes. It was in a public space - it wasn't as if the journalists were invading their home while they grieved. And I think it's important for people aound the country to be able to see what's going on. Images like stir people up to want to help eradicate crime so that there are fewer such incidents.

Jim MacMillan said...

So...

I complained about anonymous extremists who accused me of criminal behavior because they didn't like my reporting, and your response is another anonymous accusation of yet another criminal behavior?

We need debate, not hate, so man up and sign your posts kiddo, and think about using a spelling- and grammar-checker before you challenge someone's intelligence again, especially if you want to be taken seriously in a journalism class.

Jim

Taj said...

I think images are such an important medium; sometimes they can convey messages more powerfully than the best words. Like that picture of the Viet Cong, about to get shot? It almost made me cry. People need to see that. People need to feel personally connected to something, whether by empathy or anger, in order to feel passionate enough to speak up. I agree with Summergirl. I also understand what Jim said about re-traumatizing the audience..that would suck, but a lot of things could do that. Like the vietnam vet who flew the tabloid guy`s plane..

J K Hirst said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Saleem said...

It really sad when certain people go out and insult the work of someone who has actually gone abroad and brought back stories and photos that truly tell a story of what is going on in this world. I personally don't mind if you don't like "artsy fartsy" photographs, but whether you like it or not, photographs show the truth. It is up to the viewer to decided if it is bias or political, and everyone is entitled to their own opinions.

J K Hirst said...

I don't understand how someone can criticize, and insult a guest like that. Someone who took time out of his day to discuss and share his material. Someone who has clearly been through a lot. It was a hell of a lot better than Barry Levine.
The terrorist's started the war in Iraq? Really? If you want an example of pure ignorance, there you go.

(By the way, I feel that pictures of those grieving only shows reality. Something that journalism is starved for these days.)

courtney schmidt said...

"Wherever physical casualties occur, there will be psychological injuries,"
When he said that, it stuck with me. He had a lot of powerful images and stories to share, it was hard to no listen and got caught up in what he was saying. I don't care what others may say, I enjoyed him.

Sophia Salvatore said...

I thought he was awesome. Sure he wasn't very focused, but who would be after all he's seen. His photographs were really touching, and overall, I enjoyed the entire presentation. He was my favorite guest speaker that we had all semester.

bartleby4rcg said...

I agree wholeheartedly with the post above me. So many of his photographs, and even the stories he told, invoked such emotion, exactly like the image of the grieving family. With that said, I am so torn over whether, if given the option, I would use said photo. It's so heart-wrenching, but at the same time so pure and an honest portrayal of human grief.

KIERRAY said...

Those pictures were true and honest.
You can't sugar coat life.
So why sugar coat photojournalism that documents life?

Kirsten Stamn said...

I think it's important to document these kinds of images for future generations, but I agree with Jim that the public is being traumatized when violent images are shown again and again. I think that news providers just need to learn the balance of when to show pictures or videos of horrible events.

jessica lista said...

Those pictures were the truth. It is a journalist's job to be objective so you have to run those pictures. A lot of horrible situations happen in this world but people have every right to know. You can't create this fictional world through photo graphs. Some pictures may be hard to look at but they are the truth and thats what the people need to know.

Matt W. said...

What amazing photographs Jim presented to us. His story was a side of journalism that many do not hear of. I appreciated what he had to say (even if he did scramble around with his thoughts).

Catherine Cannon said...

I thought Jim gave an excellent presentation. The pictures he has taken are so thought provoking and moving. I completely agree with Kierray when she said those pictures spoke the truth and you can't sugarcoat the truth. Well said.

As journalists we are out there capturing the truth through the public's eye. That picture wasn't photographed by chasing someone into a hotel bathroom like some journalists we know of.

The picture of the girls crying with their mother was heart-wrenching and real. That's what our world needs.

RICH DEAVER said...

So some kid comes up to me in the cafe today and asks if I am the one leaving messages saying George is pissed. Well before you (George) list my name due to speculation please do your research. If you look at the IP address listed on the comments i guarantee the person leaving the comments is not me. I do not even bother with such a one sided perspective on things. I do my work take my test show up and pretend to absorb the bias being thrown our way. Next time you wish to publicly accuse me be sure you know its me because if not public ally bashing someone or accusing them without fact (SLANDER)is wrong and illegal...man i forget where i learned that!

PISSED OFF RICH DEAVER said...

P.S. BEFORE YOU GO AND TRY TO AGAIN TAINT MY IMAGE AS THE MEDIA DOES BECAUSE YOU DO NOT AGREE WITH ME LOOK AT ALL YOUR OTHER POSTS. IN EVERY SINGLE ONE THERE IS ONE OR TWO Anonymous LISTINGS. NOW IF YOU WILL CREDIT ME WITH ALL OF THEM....FINE. I FIND IT ODD THOUGH THAT YOU ASSUME THE ONE THAT YOU DO NOT AGREE WITH IS ME...YOU THINK ALL 300 OF THE STUDENTS IN THAT CLASS AGREE WITH YOU EXCEPT ME!!!!! I CAN NAME 30 RIGHT OFF THAT BAT WHO DO NOT. AGAIN I AM REALLY UPSET AS I WAS MADE AWARE OF THIS SITUATION BY A FELLOW STUDENT. THIS IS SLANDER AND I WANT AN APOLOGY!!!!

Geo said...

OK. So, does that mean you would or would not run pictures of grieving victims of crimes?

- George (the teacher who apologizes for assuming Rich was responsible for our original anonymous posting)

RICH D. said...

It would depend on the circumstance. I personally think it is needed in some instances and harmful in others. The idea that it is either black or white is absurd. I would say evaluate the situation and judge. Should we show dead kids in Afghanistan...no. I think it adds for hatred of men fighting for our freedom and besides we do not know the circumstances so we judge based on what limited amount we see. Should we show grieving family members of killed cops.... yes. This could spark a sense of humanity in people that could bring the killer to justice. Like I said it is all relative .... never black or white.

GraceMcDermott said...

I thought Jim MacMIllan was awesome. Despite what other might think about his political opinions or what not, he was speaking form a personal standpoint. He wasn't writing a news story, therefore his opinion was important in order to further understand his experience. He was my favorite speaker thus far.

As far as printing the pictures of grieving families I think it's a good thing. The image shown in class particularly allows people to feel for the family, and maybe make the story more personal than just words. It may not be fun to look at but it's important to understand so that maybe people will think of cops, and their families, or any victim for that matter before killing them.

Jenine said...

It's interesting to hear from someone experienced in the field you're trying to weasel your way into. You think hearing about the psychological affects of what you see and put yourself through would turn you away and make you want to persue a career in accounting instead. Hell, what an exciting job. You're not going to be in the face of history punching numbers for people taxes. It just reassures me that maybe I just picked the right major.

Lauren Hubbard said...

As much as "Anonymous" wants to criticize Jim for expressing his opinion, he sure does go the extra mile to show his one-sided thoughts and feelings.

I thought Jim was awesome. You can clearly tell how passionate he is, which is a key ingredient in journalism (which isn't dead).

A picture really does say a thousand words, as corny as that cliche is. It's so true. I would show dead children in Afganistan, even though we may not have full knowledge of what is going on over there- but we are able to see what is happening regardless of the initial intentions. It's explosive emotion (no pun intended). Yup, the children of a dead cop too. I'd show it all. Pictures tell stories and embody emotions that a 25 inch story can't.

Rich, maybe you should take a time out from the blog for a bit since you missed the chance to drop the class you go to everyday, but still hate. Your controversial opinions are fun to read, but take it easy.

Geo said...

Just a quick note: Rich claims it wasn't him who posted anonymously. So leave him out of this.

For that matter, we should be focusing on content, not personalities.

- George (the teacher)

Jonathan said...

Jim is a very interesting guy. He seemed to be a little nervous in front of such a big crowd but he provided us with very stunning images. I am amazed that one man could go through as much as Jim did. The Oklahoma Bombings, 9/11 and time in Iraq, Jim has done it all. I learned to gain a new respect not only for Jim but for photojournalists in general after realizing how much they witness and endure.