Monday, February 22, 2010

Would You Stand On Principle and Miss a Gigantic (and Totally Staged) Story?

TIGER WOODS FINALLY spoke to the public last week, nearly three months after revelations of his sexual escapades became tabloid fodder. Woods orchestrated a press conference where he presented his statement to only a handful of reporters and cameras, took no questions, and disappeared.

When the Golf Writers Association of America learned of the ground rules before the event, they declined to cover the press conference. The 950-member organization was offered six seats for reporters who would be in the same room as Woods during the event, but they would not be permitted to ask questions. Only the Associated Press, Reuters and Bloomberg News accepted the restrictions.

Would you stand on your principles and refuse the access? Or would you accept the ground rules as presented?

18 comments:

Annmarie Dinan said...

I think i would probably abide by Woods' restrictions, because this is a story that needs to be covered because people are really curious about the whole TIger Woods situation.

Luis Crespo said...

No, this is not a story that needs to be covered. This is trash. I am very glad they did not cover the "news conference." And you can bet I wouldn't cover it. I found it disgusting that I could not switch the channel without seeing Tiger Woods on my TV. ABC, Fox, CBS, NBC, CNN, Fox News, MSNBC, HLN, CNBC, Fox Business, Bloomberg, Univision, E!, ESPN, and the Golf Channel (and probably others, that list is from TVNewser) all aired Woods' statement. This as we were learning that Iran may be working on a nuclear warhead for a missile, and the day after the plane crash in Texas (which developed into another story), and a dozen other things that deserved coverage ahead of Woods.

Craig said...

I would stand on completely different principles and say that I wouldn't cover the story at all. Not only do I think this is not news worthy, I think its one of the biggest problems with our news media.

He is a professional athlete. Sure he seems like a good guy, but he is famous. Some people do bad things, I get it. Tiger blew it, but lets leave it at that.

Gillian Francella said...

I agree with Craig. This is not newsworthy it's just trash. Beside the idea that this is a personal matter of Woods, if I as a journalist you would have to compromise my job does not seem like this is story I would want to cover.

Sarah Sibel said...

If it were me, I would respect his wishes, because this story has been dragged out long enough and there has been enough drama surrounding it already. As much as I used to respect Tiger Woods as an athlete and man, and as much as I think that he is indecent for what he has done now, I am honestly starting to feel sorry for the guy. He like everyone else is human, and people make mistakes. Let it go America and leave the poor guy alone. Let him live alone in peace, sulk in his misery, and realize the immense impact of his mistakes. As much as what he did was wrong and as much of a public figure that he is, he still deserves a little respect to speak his point of view without being attacked.

Jackie said...

It's his personal life. Unless his personal life is affecting his career, he shouldn't be apologizing to us. Since it does affect his career, he should probably just apologize to his endorsers and maybe fans and such, but IT'S HIS LIFE! His mistakes has not caused me any grief and I, therefore, do not give a damn and do don't want/need his apology.

Peter Dalmasy said...

I'm confused as to why the Golf Writers were not allowed to make questions. I find it a personal matter, not a golf matter, which in hindsight is probably the right decision for them not to cover the event or attend it. Just like Kobe Bryant, Tiger is going to bounce back.

Anonymous said...

Brittni M.Baldrich

A story is a story. You must take what your given and make it better then the next person. If Tiger Woods had restricted each reporter evenly, then its your job to take the extra mile and get information that was not given during the press conference. Perhaps a reporter should investigate beyond what Tiger Woods is willing to give everyone.

Pseudo said...

I wouldn't have covered it for the simple fact that I do not think it is that important.
I didn't even read to see what Tiger said and I definitely skip past his name when I see it on gossip blogs. Some people might feel differently, but as Craig was saying, I just don't think it is a newsworthy story.
Besides, if he isn't answering questions then everyone will have the same story.
Tiger says "blah blah..."
Seems boring.

Dan P. said...

If I had my way, there wouldn't have been any coverage because this isn't newsworthy. If I was Tiger Woods, I would've stood at the podium and told the press and anyone interested in the "story" to mind their own damn business then walked off.

Kristen K♥ said...

I would stand by my principles and refuse the access. This is Woods' and his wife's Elin personal life and situation. Who am I to interfere with or even question him on his personal decisions? Had I cheated on my wife with a bunch of women like Woods' I would NOT stand up in front of 5, 10 or even 200 people to apologize. My apology does not go to them it goes to my wife and family.

Berryman, A said...

I probably would have not showed up to the press conference. I truthfully feel like everyone is making this a big deal, when people cheat everyday, but since its Tiger Woods he recieves a press conference! I also do not feel as if this whole situation is news worthy.

Heather Flanagan said...

I completely agree with what the Golf Writers Association did. Why bother even covering something like this that you are basically not getting any new information from. If no one was allowed to ask questions, than the whole thing is basically just going to be Tiger Woods saying he is sorry, and at this point does anyone really care if he's sorry? I don't think so. What people care about are asking him questions as to why he did what he did and things like that and if this was not allowing questions to be asked then i just see it as a waste of time.

Brian Okum said...

Its fodder, and I think the media knew it. Who knows what's actually going on, and who cares now. Tiger appears to be a closet drama queen who thinks everyone is still interested. If he wants respect he can't be doing this stuff.

Julian Galette said...

I wouldn't cover this if whoever I was working for didn't make me. Honestly, enough time has passed that woods didn't have to say anything to anyone about the situation. All he needed to do was keep his mouth shut and make some holes in one.

Not saying that would excuse his behavior or that people shouldn't be accountable for things like this, but just because he's a public figure doesn't make him accountable to us. He's not Bill Clinton.

If the world stopped every time an athlete cheated on their spouse...well...the world would never turn.

Michael Stoltzfus said...

I definitely would have covered the event. Just because you can't ask questions doesn't mean that the story shouldn't be told.

Lauren Nucci said...

I would want to cover the story because I would be interested to sit face-to-face with Woods and really investigate his character. I thought his attempt of an apology was pretty insincere and it would have definitely affected my opinion of him to see him in his true character, and one chance to change people's perspectives. He did a pretty awful job, and although yes, this story is garbage and i don't believe it important enough to be shown on live television and dragged out in every magazine/newspaper .. I'll be honest and admit i would jump for the opportunity.

Francisco Ovalle said...

this is not newsworthy, its trash. but on the other hand, we as journalists have to cover it, its not matter of right or wrong, or if is newsworthy, its news, and we cover news. so i would definitely be there covering tiger woods, why not?