Thursday, October 13, 2016

Is It Cool To Fanboy Out and Take a Selfie?

Is there anything wrong with a journalist asking for a selfie with the person they were just interviewing for a story?

Does asking for the selfie turn the journalist into a fan, and therefore, their credibility is shot?

Or is it just a selfie? You know, like, everyone does it. And it's Anderson fricking Cooper, right?

Does it depend upon the situation? For example, if it's a serious story about politics and/or policy, probably no selfie, right? But if it's Beyonce ...

Or are you sacrificing your integrity/professionalism every time you fanboy out and ask to do the selfie?

13 comments:

Samuel Trilling said...

I think that in recent years, taking a picture with someone famous does not necessarily mean that you endorse them or that you are a fan. However, it could be considered unprofessional and is probably best reserved for when the subject wishes to take a picture together. Anderson Cooper is (unfortunately), a household name and a celebrity that can be detached from his work. This means that a selfie with him could potentially increase the popularity and interest in your work, by associating such a prominent figure such as Anderson Cooper with yourself.

Samuel Trilling said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Moriah Thoman said...

I would first consider your motives for taking the selfie in the first place. Are you taking it to remember that you met them? or are you taking it just for proof to show your friends, family, etc. I think if you do a good enough interview, that should be proof enough that you have met the person and really gotten to know their thoughts. Everyone knows what Beyoncé looks like, but does everyone know what is going on in her mind? I would feel more accomplished in learning unique, personal information about the person and their ideas on a subject than in taking a selfie. Then you are a person that has strong interviewing skills and journalistic integrity as well as a person who has met a popular public figure.

Lauren Hillegas said...

I believe that if you are professionally interviewing an individual, it is pretty unprofessional to ask to take a selfie. You are a journalist, you are there on business, not pleasure. If you go to a concert and get to meet the performer but you aren't working, then by all means ask for a selfie, but it can come off disrespectful when interviewing someone. If the person being interviewed is the one to ask you would like a picture, that's different. They are offering, and then I can see it being more acceptable. When you are interviewing someone professionally for a business, I think that it is a good rule of thumb to opt out of the selfie mania and stay professional.

Siani Colon said...

It's understandable to want a selfie with someone who would high-profile, but I think as a journalist you have to sacrifice that thought to act like a fan because it comes across as being unprofessional. Not just the selfie, but even how you may word the caption if you were to post it on social media, may lead your motives of being a journalist, the reason to you following this piece, and your credibility itself to be questioned. It's very situational because if the person you are interviewing offers to take a selfie, that's one thing (and used it as a way to promote your article, not to go off about how much of a big fan you are). Another situation is if you are NOT currently doing any journalistic business. If you really want that picture with Beyonce as a keep-sake and she lets you, just maybe not post it around everywhere. If you're interviewing someone, it's best to just strike out on the selfie. I also think that the longer you are doing that as a career, the appeal or urge to even take a selfie or anything like that kind of fades away because you're used to being surrounded by people like that.

Cortney Dillard said...

I think it is fine to "fanboy" over the people you interview because that has nothing to do with the information you are gathering. Prominent people such as President Obama has admitted to having moments of being starstruck, so it would be unreasonable to say that journalists aren't allowed to feel the same way. I am not personally a fan of the "selfie", but pictures in general I see no problem with. Some interviews are once in a lifetime and in order to remember the moment there is nothing wrong with having a photo as a keep sake.

Tracie Thompson said...

The way I think media is going you have to promote yourself and your work on social media. If the best way to promote your story is with a photo with the person you are interviewing, then do it. Now if you are fan-girling over someone and you are in work mode/representing the people you work for asking for a selfie is obviously unprofessional.

Walter Kirby said...

Taking a selfie with someone is not unethical. When you are interviewing a famous person or popular figure, you should be able to express your personal side so long as you do not express that personal side to the public. If you are on-air, you should by no means act like you are buddy-buddy with the person you are interviewing. But off the air, if you want to have a memory that will last forever with someone you'd never thought you would be face to face with, you should be able to take a picture with that person. It should not be viewed as some massive blown out of proportion big deal that I took a picture with someone popular. I could have had someone watch the channel while I interviewed the person and take the picture for me and then send it to me. So either way, I could have the picture so it should not be a problem if a journalist wants to take a picture with a popular person so long that it is not in the public's eyes.

Zach Kocis said...

I think it's okay to "fanboy" out when you are a civilian, not acting as a journalist. If you are there interviewing a celebrity for journalistic purposes, I don't think it's okay to ask that person for a selfie or a picture. If someone else takes a picture of you two without your express request, then I think it's okay because you haven't been compromising your journalistic ethics. But I think once you ask for something, you owe them something.

Lisa Cunningham said...

I do believe that it is acceptable and normal to "fangirl" or "fanboy" every once in a while, however certain situations do not make it appropriate. For me personally, if I am lucky enough to meet someone famous, I like to get a picture with them in order to remember and cherish the moment. If I was interviewing a celebrity I do not think that I would ask for a selfie necessarily, but I would take a picture if someone offered the opportunity. I do not think that this kills a journalists credibility because taking pictures is something that has become such a norm in recent years. Taking a picture with the celebrity and posting it on social media can even be a way to promote the the journalist's story. If the interview airs on TV or is streamed online, people can easily take pictures of the two of you together so what is the harm in just taking one for yourself? I see why in some situations it could be an issue, but I do not think that saying that will change people's actions.

Samantha Nestel said...

As a journalist, it is not appropriate to take selfies with the person you are interviewing for a story. The interview is a part of your job where you are expected to act professionally, therefore "fangirling" or "fanboying" over the said celebrity should not be allowed. That being said, afterwards, when the story is written and published you can fangirl/fanboy all you want, but you have to do it on your own time. As a journalist, you represent not only yourself, but your company and fanboying/fangirling over a celebrity is not a good image to present to the public. On the job, you are there to write unobjectively and with that, your relationship with the celebrity is strictly business. Therefore, you are there to get the facts, not a selfie.

Priscilla Mattos said...

Priscilla Silva* said

I think it is part of the purpose of the selfie. Is it for you? Is it for the public? Journalists have the right to have bias, they just can't put it in public. The journalist is allowed to make memories, but they have to be careful so they can keep their credibility. Maybe, the selfie can be also part of the story, many of entertainment journalist took the selfie in order to make the story mor fun and interesting and the bring the audience closer.

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