Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Wouldn't You Like to Know, Weather Boy?


A Nevada meteorologist was doing a live shot at a place that sells fireworks and he asked a kid standing nearby what are the best kind of fireworks to buy.

The kid's response was Internet gold. It's been seen millions of times and has been turned into numerous music tracks.

But it was a fake.

The kid is the son of the meteorologist. Not sure if they planned the response but they clearly had staged the moment to make it seem real.

After the kid's snarky remark, the meteorologist asks, "Where are your parents?'

Should the meteorologist be punished for creating a piece of fiction? Does this incident undermine his credibility?

Or does it not matter? It's just a fluff piece for the Fourth of July, you know?


5 comments:

Anonymous said...

Punishment, in this case, would be pretty overboard, it's not a real crime, or as far as I know, an ethical violation. That doesn't make it any better, though. If most of my college experience was spent walking up to strangers to interview and take their pictures, it shouldn't be a huge feat in the actual work place. I say that to assume that the reporter is saving himself the stress of having to talk to other people who know nothing about tv.
Putting friends and family in the news, planned or unplanned, also poses a potential conflict of interest.
A last benefit of doubt might be that there were probably no customers at the store at the time of the recording and since the reporter probably needed another source for his assertions, he decided to use his son. Still, and again, conflict of interest. The familiarity between father and son probably prompted the boy to talk like that.

Ayooluwa Ariyo said...

Punishment, in this case, would be pretty overboard, it's not a real crime, or as far as I know, an ethical violation. That doesn't make it any better, though. If most of my college experience was spent walking up to strangers to interview and take their pictures, it shouldn't be a huge feat in the actual work place. I say that to assume that the reporter is saving himself the stress of having to talk to other people who know nothing about tv.
Putting friends and family in the news, planned or unplanned, also poses a potential conflict of interest.
A last benefit of doubt might be that there were probably no customers at the store at the time of the recording and since the reporter probably needed another source for his assertions, he decided to use his son. Still, and again, conflict of interest. The familiarity between father and son probably prompted the boy to talk like that.

Colin O'Connor - tuf08136@temple.edu said...

I think that any reporter who fakes a shot, scene or take should be subject to some form of punishment. Depending upon the platform they are faking on, the severity of the punishments should derive from that. Even though this piece may have not hurt anyone in the act of the set-up, but it may spark a surge in more people making fake news, and we do not need anymore fake news

Johnterri Rivers-Maldonado said...

This video does take away from the meteorologist creditability. Not only is this video a conflict of interest because the little boy in the video is his child and the meteorologist is pretending like he doesn't know his son, the video is also unethical. For one thing, as a journalist your first obligation is to the people. This meteorologist decided to lie to the people upon producing this video. However, for this video specially I strongly believe the meteorologist should not be punished. Although this video is definitely considered fake news, this video doesn't directly affect anybody.

kristinahojholt said...

It's a pity you don't have a donate button! I'd most certainly donate to this brilliant blog! I suppose for now i'll settle for bookmarking and adding your RSS feed to my Google account. I look forward to brand new updates and will share this site with my Facebook group. Chat soon! travel journalism internships